Self Regulations Strategies Journal

Impulse Control Reflection Journal - Building Executive Functioning Skills

Impulse Control Reflection Journal – Building Executive Functioning Skills

Self regulations skills also known as impluse control are one of the most important skills we teach in class and at home. Yet, neither parents nor teachers receive adequate training for it. Teaching impulse skills to a child who frequently calls out in class, interrupts, doesn’t finish class work, uses loud voice, doesn’t follow class routine, comes unprepared to class… often seems overwhelming. Plus, incessant correcting isn’t an option if we are to build a positive student-teacher or parent-child relationships. The underlying cause of all this behavior is impluse control. The behavior is not intentional. It is a symptom of weak self-regulation/impulse control. Teaching impluse control skills and routine is crucial for behavior change. Reading books that simply say “make better choices” will not create change. Also, a large number of impulse control books are written for the very young audience. Once out of primary years, students need to use reasoning, positive self-talk, and reflection skills, to impove their impluse control and social skills.

The Reflection Journal can be used in class and at home. Students are able to analyze their goals and areas/times of frustration. With the use of calming methods and positive self-talk, students make a record of improvement(s) and develop their plan of action. Improving self regulation is not an overnight process. The goal of reflection journal is to become a portfolio of progress over many months or even a year.

Grade level: K-5. 

Mrs. Lena, M.Ed. 

Self-Regulation Books:

Self-Reg: How to Help Your Child (and You) Break the Stress Cycle and Successfully Engage with Life - by Dr. Shanker

Self-Reg: How to Help Your Child (and You) Break the Stress Cycle and Successfully Engage with Life – by Dr. Shanker

Self-Reg: How to Help Your Child (and You) Break the Stress Cycle and Successfully Engage with Life Paperback – by Dr. Stuart Shanker  is a great resource for both teachers and parents. I love that Dr. Shanker comes from the view that there is no such a thing as a bad kid. When we encounter undesirable behavior at home or school the cause is always the lack of self-regulation skills, which can be taught, made into a habit, and habits then become behavior. When we get to see the behavior for what it is, it is much easier not to be upset or offended by it.  

 

 

 

 

“Self Regulations Strategies Journal”

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Grandpa Ben and The Hungry Little Monsters Who Visit Our Brain – by Ben Hirshberg

 

Grandpa Ben and The Hungry Little Monsters Who Visit Our Brain – by Ben Hirshberg

Grandpa Ben and The Hungry Little Monsters Who Visit Our Brain – by Ben Hirshberg

“Grandpa Ben and The Hungry Little Monsters Who Visit Our Brain” by Ben Hirshberg

As a teacher, I have seen social skills only being directly taught in the school counseling office. Most kids don’t visit counseling office, ever. Yet, most kids need to be taught social skills. As a parent, I talk to my kids about being kind and positive on daily basis. These most important life habits need to be reinforced until they become internalized and automatic.

In “Grandpa Ben and The Hungry Little Monsters Who Visit Our Brain”, Grandpa Ben describes the little monsters who visit our brain in terms that children understand. The little monsters are negative thoughts and ideas that multiply and cause damage if we let them stay too long. Re-living fights and arguments kids got into is something all kids can relate to.

In a child friendly manner, Ben Hirshberg’s book is teaching kids how to identify “monsters” and how to get rid of them. Being mindful of positive thoughts allows for happier days, willingness to have new experiences and learn new things.

Great read. Every family and classroom should have a copy.

Happy Reading!
Mrs. Lena, M.Ed.